The Joys of a Food Memory by Rita Cevaal

This time of the year is the perfect excuse to cozy up and watch all of the great Academy Award nominated films. One of my favorites this year was the film Lion. Based on a true story, it is about a small boy who gets lost on a train that takes him thousands of miles from home. He is eventually adopted by a couple from Australia, and settles comfortably there. It is not until he is at University that he meets other Indian students; the smell and sight of Indian food and culture trigger childhood memories .

This story reminds me of when my Grandma would visit from California, always arriving with trinkets and stories of her travels. While she was staying with us she would always bake. We would place bookmarks in cookbooks, marking the things we wanted her to make the next time she was in town. Food certainly has a way of generating memories, and this is especially true with a particular recipe of hers. She visited one time with a recipe cut out from a newspaper for “Boiled Cookies,” and it became an instant favorite. Not only were they yummy, but we loved that they were called “boiled” cookies. Today, many call these “No-Bake Cookies.” Despite the different names, they are still made the same way, bringing butter, milk, sugar, and cocoa to a boil on the stove before adding vanilla, peanut butter, and oatmeal. The next step is to spoon the mixture onto sheets of waxed or parchment on the kitchen counter, while fighting the willpower not to eat them before they cool.

I know my family now has their own memories of these cookies since they were a regular after school snack. We call these a semi-healthy cookie since they are gluten-free and we make them with organic sugar and oats!

 

 

No Bake Cookies
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups sugar
  2. ¼ cup cocoa
  3. ½ cup milk
  4. ½ cup butter
  5. ½ teaspoon vanilla
  6. pinch of salt
  7. ½ cup peanut butter
  8. 3 cups rolled oats
Instructions
  1. Mix sugar, cocoa, milk, and butter in a saucepan. Stir over medium heat until it boils. Remove from heat and cool for 1 minute. Add remaining ingredients and mix well.
  2. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto wax or parchment paper. Let cool completely before removing from paper.
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Making the Sale by Kelly Montgomery

Without a doubt Marcel’s is a great place to work. It offers fun co-workers, customers who become friends, the smell of bacon frying or onions caramelizing back in the kitchen, and so much more. But this job is not without its occupational hazards. Being continually and relentlessly exposed to terrific cooking tools and beautiful home accents can lead to overspending, marital strain and insufficient cabinet space.

As you might imagine, I’ve got quite a collection of kitchen stuff and exquisite tableware. Brock, my husband, has developed a certain look when he sees me coming in with a Marcel’s bag. It’s a look that says, “Is it necessary to have four different machines to make coffee?” (Um….kind of! They’re all different! And anyway we have 5 not 4. Just saying.). It asks “Don’t we already have way too many plates?” (Well, technically yes, but look at how gorgeous these are and how great they look with all our other Juliska plates!!)

It begins innocently enough. I’m having a discussion about the wonderful features of a product with a customer and next thing I know I’m the one who’s standing at the counter purchasing it. I’ve literally sold it to myself!! It was in this exact way that I recently became the owner of a Fagor Lux Multi-Cooker. I think selling that machine to me may have been the best sale I’ve ever made.

So I brought it home. And when, as expected, I got “the look”. I countered, “But it’s a pressure cooker and a slow cooker and a rice cooker and an egg cooker and a steamer! It browns and simmers and keeps food warm until you’re ready to eat it! It makes yogurt for crying out loud!  It even does the dishes!”  (Wait. No. But you can brown things and then finish them in the same pan so it basically helps with the dishes!)  I sound like an infomercial!!

I’ve owned my Multi-Cooker for about a month and have had so much fun trying new recipes and learning easier and faster ways of doing things.  And when Brock recently wondered aloud  “Where has this thing been all our lives?”, I shot him my look that says “Told ya!”

Stay tuned for my upcoming demo using the Multi Cooker to make Pressure Cooker Penne with Squash and Ricotta.

See you at Marcel’s!

A New Year and a New Focus in the Kitchen by Paul Lindemuth

The holiday decorations are taken down and packed away. The last of the Christmas cookies are eaten. And now I’m finally able to move forward to the first weekend that does not involve the responsibility of entertaining or being entertained! It was a very busy season of holiday cooking and baking with so many lists that needed checking and re-checking with a work-related event on the calendar nearly every day.

If you’re like me, a New Year brings a new focus to so many aspects of everyday life and it’s a good time to bring that focus to our homes and kitchens. Here are some thoughts (OK….resolutions) that I’m bringing into our kitchen and home in 2017:

BRIGHTEN UP YOUR KITCHEN

You’ve spent so much time in the kitchen and looked at the same four walls and all the surfaces for hours on end. January is a great time to give your kitchen a good cleaning from top to bottom. And when you’ve finished that chore, create a new focal point with a planter of bright green herbs on the counter or a new food photo hung on the wall or a new cookbook displayed in a book holder.

GET ORGANIZED

This is a great time to open all the cabinets and drawers and take control of the clutter. Kitchen tools are often thrown into a drawer in haste when you’re busy, so pull everything out to clean up and organize. The same holds true for cabinets and drawers with ingredients and spices that may be past their prime. Toss that stuff out and get a fresh start.

EAT MORE HEALTHILY

 Begin with small goals that are easily achievable on an everyday basis. Start packing a healthy lunch to take to work. Grab an apple for your snack to ease into eating more nutritiously. Once you’ve conquered the small steps add more healthy habits like cutting back on bad carbs and sugar until you’re eating more healthily regularly.


MAKE TIME FOR FAMILY

I think we’ve all had our fill of office parties, holiday feasting and revelry. Before the New Year gets too busy, make sure to set aside time for family. Block off some time that’s reserved just for activities at home. Eating together around the dining table is a great way to bring focus back to home and family.  Please enjoy this beautiful and vibrant recipe around the table together!

Baked Whitefish with Coconut-Cilantro Sauce
Serves 4
Print
Ingredients
  1. canola oil spray
  2. four 6-ounce whitefish fillets
  3. 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  4. 1/2 cup light reduced-fat coconut milk
  5. 1/2 cup cilantro leaves
  6. 1 teaspoon peeled chopped fresh ginger
  7. 1/2 teaspoon garam masala
  8. 2 garlic cloves
  9. 1 small jalapeño pepper, seeded and chopped
  10. fresh cilantro leaves for garnish
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Spray a 9x13-inch baking pan with canola oil spray. Sprinkle the fish with the salt and place it in the pan.
  2. In the jar of a blender combine the coconut milk, cilantro, ginger, garam masala, garlic and jalapeño. Pulse until fairly smooth.
  3. Pour the mixture over the fish. Bake until the fish is just opaque in the center, about 15 minutes.
  4. Transfer the fish to heated plates. Garnish with more cilantro and serve right away.
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Gratitude in the Small Things by Teri Hiben

teriblog2Yes, things are getting busy. With Thanksgiving dinner and then holiday shopping and baking and visiting, life can get a bit hectic. Recent family health issues have caused me to slow down and reflect on the things that matter. While I’m thankful for so many big blessings like family, friends and home, I’m also thankful for many smaller joys.

I love the way the rain hangs on the crabapples in the back tree, the voices of the new neighbor boys as they play in the backyard reminding me of my own boys. There’s nothing like a great book on a cold evening, the hoot of the owl when I can’t sleep at night. And I think my favorite meal consists of a great bowl of soup and some homemade bread. Simple is many times better.

teriblog1I encourage you this holiday season to take some time to slow down and be thankful for your many blessings, help those who have less than you, look for the good in those around you, enjoy a job well done, show simple kindness and enjoy it in others. And sit down and enjoy a bowl of soup and some fresh, homemade bread.

Enjoy the holidays ahead!

Oatmeal Bread
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups boiling water
  2. 1 cup quick-cooking oats
  3. 2 packages dry yeast or 4 teaspoons dry yeast
  4. 1/3 cup lukewarm water
  5. 1 tablespoon salt
  6. 1/2 cup honey
  7. 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  8. 5-6 cups flour
  9. 1 egg beaten with 2 tablespoons water
Instructions
  1. In a large mixer bowl, pour the boiling water over the oats and let the mixture rest until the oats are completely softened, about 30 minutes.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the yeast with the lukewarm water and allow to stand 10 minutes.
  3. To the oat mixture, add the salt, honey and melted butter; combine, then stir in the yeast. Gradually add enough flour to make the dough soft and kneadable. Knead for 10 minutes, adding more flour as needed. The dough should be elastic, soft and smooth.
  4. Place the dough in a large, oiled bowl, turning to coat the surface. Cover with a damp cloth and place in a warm place to rise for about an hour.
  5. Preheat oven to 325.
  6. After the dough has doubled in bulk, punch it down and divide into 2 8”x4” loaf pans that have been sprayed with Pam and sprinkled with rolled oats. There is no need for further rising. Brush the loaves with the egg wash and sprinkle some additional oats on top. Bake for about 50 minutes, or until golden brown. Tip bread out onto a wire rack to cool.
Notes
  1. This bread freezes well in a Ziploc freezer bag.
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Take it Slow by Lynn Dugan

Savor – Relax – Reflect – Connect – Cherish – Celebrate – Delight – Share

lynnblog1These words are often compromised in our fast-paced culture.  But last month, when I had the opportunity to visit my Great Aunt Angie in Italy, I was reminded of how important they are to remember to prioritize in our busy lives. Angie and my Uncle Gino used to own a neighborhood restaurant in Chicago.  After Uncle Gino passed, she returned to Lammari, her small Italian hometown in Tuscany.  In August, I was able to see her for the first time since she left Chicago twenty years ago!

Angie lives on a property that she shares with her sister Renatta, Renatta’s grown children, and their families. They invited my oldest daughter and I to their homes for dinner and we had the chance to meet and share a meal with Angie’s extended family for the first time.

We spent several hours at the alfresco dining table, surrounded by all of the family, greeting each other, eating, talking, laughing, and reminiscing. In fact, if it had not lasted several hours, we would not have been able to enjoy all of the delicious food they prepared for us. The first course was a hearty lasagna followed by a pair of salads – tomato with red onions and leafy greens. Next we were served plates of thinly-sliced roast pork and roast beef with gravy, and sides of oven-roasted potatoes and a zucchini frittata. Of course we enjoyed local wine and to top off the feast, we indulged in almond tart and coffee for dessert.

lynnblog3It was magical to be part this multi-generational meal; everyone brought a plate to the table that they had prepared in their own kitchen.  There was a little competition between everyone’s dishes, a little teasing of the presentation, but lots of love. It was remarkable to see the way they lingered at the table, even the young children, all enjoying each other’s company. There was not a single distraction during dinner from any electronics. I treasured the culture surrounding the meal and hope I can bring this Tuscan experience into my own family by slowing down at mealtime, allowing more time for conversation, and taking time to connect, relax, reflect, and celebrate.  Although an experience like this cannot be fully recreated, even a little change towards taking it slow would make a big difference. And now that my own kids are getting older, this is more doable than a few years ago!

As you try to do the same, enjoy this recipe for Renatta’s Zucchini Frittata.  Even more recipes from Tuscany will be shared at Marcel’s Midday “Tuscan Country Kitchen” that I am teaching on October 26th.   I hope to see you there!

Renatta’s Zucchini Frittata
Serves 6
Print
Ingredients
  1. 5 large eggs
  2. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  3. Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  4. 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
  5. 4 tablespoons olive oil
  6. 1 large onion, diced
  7. 1 pound zucchini, cut in half lengthwise and into 1/4–inch slices
  8. 2 tablespoons fresh Italian parsley, chopped
  9. 2 tablespoons fresh basil, cut into chiffonade
Instructions
  1. Preheat broiler.
  2. Crack and beat eggs in a bowl. Add grated cheese and season with salt and pepper, set aside. In a 10-inch skillet, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil. Sauté onion until it begins to caramelize - about 5 minutes. Add zucchini to the skillet and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes until zucchini is tender but not soft, and excess liquid is cooked off (drain off any extra liquid if present when zucchini is finished cooking). Add parsley and basil. Drizzle remaining olive oil around pan and heat while evenly distributing pan contents.
  3. Give eggs a quick stir and pour into pan. Immediately reduce to low heat and cook until eggs are just set, about 12-15 minutes.
  4. To finish the cooking, slide pan 6 inches under broiler until the top is golden (1-2 minutes). Please be careful not to overcook.
  5. The frittata can be slid onto a serving plate after edges are loosened with a knife. Serve warm or cold, cut into wedges. Enjoy slowly, just as Renatta, Angie, and all of my family in Italy would do!
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

A New Kind of Lunch/Snack: Triangle Sushi (Samgak Kimbap) by Jenny Chang

TriangleSushiHaving grown up in a traditional Korean home, there were many dishes that I was often embarrassed or afraid to introduce to my friends. Kimbap was one of them. I distinctly remember going on a preschool field trip to the circus where my mom had to pack a lunch for me to eat on the bus. My mother, having only known what kids in Korea ate for lunches, packed me two rolls of kimbap (aka. Sushi) neatly packed in what would today be known as a bento box. I looked around me and saw my fellow classmates eating ham or PB&J sandwiches, and so desperately didn’t want to be different with my rice rolls and seaweed.  It was mortifying as a 5 year old to open my lunch and have to quickly eat my rice rolls to avoid as many “What is that?” questions from classmates. Who in preschool wants to be different? Certainly not me.

Flash forward thirty years later, and I have a different story to share. You see, my oldest son (who is now 12) loves kimbap and his favorite is triangle kimbap. He begs me every year to send him to school with these cute rice triangles and every year I turn him down. You see, I’m still scarred by my own experience in school where bringing something different and foreign for lunch made me somehow not normal.  Succumbing to his ongoing request, I finally relinquished and sent him to school with seasoned rice and nori. Unsurprisingly, many of his friends asked what it was, but truly out of curiosity. Even more to my surprise many of them asked if they could try it. And some even LIKED it!!!

Triangle kimbap is a staple snack, lunch or even light dinner in our home. It’s a quick meal that can be made from staple pantry ingredients served with a green salad, veggies, or even soup. In fact, often in Korea, it is served alongside miso soup. Through my son and his adventurous classmates, I’ve learned that children today are far more open to trying new things and certainly more exposed to other cultures and food. It’s encouraging to see that my children can enjoy what they like, when they like it without fear or trepidation that someone might be offended by their snack or lunch. It’s comforting to know that our world and society has developed into a food-loving domain where all cultures are not only celebrated and appreciated but also sampled! Mash-shee-suh (Yummy in Korean)!

Tuna Triangle Sushi (Samgak Kimbap)
Yields 6
A delicious Korean snack.
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3 cups of cooked rice (can also substitute half with brown rice)
  2. 1 T. toasted sesame oil
  3. ¼ t. toasted sesame seeds (optional)
  4. ½ t. salt
  5. 1 t. rice vinegar
  6. tuna in oil, drained (I love the white tuna sold at Marcels)
  7. 3 sheets of sushi nori (cut in half)
  8. ¼ cup water
Instructions
  1. Gently mix cooked rice with sesame oil, salt, vinegar, and sesame seeds. Place the triangle mold* on the top half of the ½ sheet of sushi nori and fill 1/3 with the seasoned rice. Add a small amount of tuna on top of the seasoned rice (about ½ tablespoon) and fill triangle mold with more seasoned rice. Tap with the top of the mold and push the rice through the mold using the top. Fold over the bottom half of the sushi nori over the rice triangle and fold sides down. Dip fingertips into the water and gently rub some water on the top sides of the nori still folded down and fold over the triangle.
Notes
  1. *Sushi Triangle Molds are available at most Asian grocery stores
  2. I often use tuna, but this dish can be prepared using cooked salmon, chicken, beef or even pickled vegetables. Just be sure that whatever you use to fill the triangle doesn’t have any liquid, as excess liquid can make the rice watery.
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

70 Years of Tradition by Jamie Bordoshuk

This June marks the 70th Annual Bordoshuk picnic. Our family tradition started back in 1946 when my parents decided to round up their family and friends for a day in the country. They were eager to escape the hustle and bustle of Chicago and enjoy fresh air, each other and of course, food. Little did they know that this one day would be the first of many years to come.

BordoFamily50thI come from a big Polish family. Though we are scattered around the country, no one would dream of missing picnic day. And our picnic is only getting larger as we introduce new spouses, babies and friends.

After 69 years, we’ve become a well-oiled machine when it comes to the food. The picnic tables are lined with a wide array of delicious dishes, some of which have become staples year after year. It wouldn’t be a picnic without Auntie Rose’s potato salad, Cousin Audrey’s chicken enchiladas or Auntie Elaine’s pastries. The star of the show has always been my mom’s polish sausage and sauerkraut. I love honoring her memory every year by recreating her recipe down to the last caraway seed.

On June 12th, you can bet that the Bordoshuks will be toasting each other on achieving this milestone and already looking forward to next year. Sto Lat!

Polish Sausage, Caraway and Sauerkraut
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 lbs. smoked polish sausage
  2. 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  3. 1 16 oz. can sauerkraut
  4. ½ lb. bacon
  5. 1 T. caraway seeds
Instructions
  1. In a Dutch oven, cook bacon until crisp, approximately 6-8 minutes. Remove.
  2. In drippings, cook onion until tender, approx. 6-8 minutes. Add sauerkraut and toss until thoroughly mixed. Return bacon and add caraway seeds.
  3. Cut sausage links into 2-3 inch pieces and add to pot. Cover and simmer 20-30 minutes.
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

#mymarcels by Alicia Sitley

Editor’s Note: We are thrilled to have a guest blog post this week from one of our delightful customers, Alicia Sitley.  Join Alicia and start hash-tagging your favorite finds from Marcel’s with #mymarcels on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.  We can’t wait to see and share your stories.  Thanks Alicia!

As I go through my daily routines, I realize that each trip to Marcel’s has helped me to collect beautiful “home souvenirs” that quickly become part of our family’s tradition. Like keepsakes from a beautiful journey, everything I buy at Marcel’s now inspires a story.

#mymarcels1Beginning with coffee, the #mymarcels Nespresso machine saved us from severe “espresso depression” by continuing our daily cappuccino and espresso indulgences after a trip to Italy. (We even bought a second Nespresso for our college freshman, which means #mymarcels extends as far south as Champaign-Urbana.)

#mymarcels also includes our cheery cherry Le Creuset French Press; black Epicurean cutting boards so sleek they triggered a friend to confess cutting-board envy; and the gorgeous Chilewich placemats that gracefully catch our spills and withstand my daughter’s aggressive wipe downs.

And please, let us pay special tribute to the Camerons Stovetop Smoker, an “emotional purchase” after a three-minute description of its flair for mouth-watering, smoked yumminess. This smoking won’t kill you because everything it produces is so good you’d die for it first. Cheese, veggies, fish, meat, everything’s better when we smoke it!

When I visit Marcel’s, I admit I look around and long to adopt nearly everything displayed as #mymarcels, but that would just be gluttonous. Time and life’s events will inspire my next purchases, because Marcel’s rewards our journeys. What souvenirs have you taken home from Marcel’s? Look around your kitchen, then tell everyone at #mymarcels. 

What YOU Need to Know about the New Dietary Guidelines for Americans by Lynn Dugan

DietaryGuidelinesJust recently, the Obama administration released the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. These guidelines are revised every 5 years with the purpose to help us make healthy food and beverage choices and to serve as the foundation for vital nutrition policies and programs throughout the US. If you are interested in learning more, here is the Executive Summary.

After sifting through the report, I have prepared some noteworthy points to highlight. Let’s start with how healthy eating is defined by the Guidelines:

  • A variety of vegetables from all of the color groups–dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy, and others.
  • Fruits, especially whole fruits
  • Grains, at least half of which are whole grains
  • Dairy foods (milk, yogurt, cheese and or fortified soy beverages), fat free or low fat
  • A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes, nuts and seeds and soy products
  • Oils

This healthy eating plan is nothing new but keep in mind, many people with a goal of ‘healthy eating’ may have cut dairy foods from their diets. But dairy foods are recommended to help meet the calcium, vitamin D and potassium needs for everyone— these are the nutrients we are not getting enough of. The Guidelines recommend 3 servings of dairy daily for everyone 9 years and older. One serving equals 1 cup milk or yogurt and 1-1/2 ounce of cheese.

Next, let’s look at what to limit in our eating. You may have already heard the big news: cut down on sugar and sodium and keep saturated fat intake ‘in check.’  Saturated fat is found mostly in animal protein foods. By purchasing and preparing lean cuts of meat and varying your protein choices to include legumes and fish, this recommendation is manageable.

The sugar recommendation includes any sugar added to foods but does not include the natural sugar found in foods like fruit and dairy. The recommendation is to cap added sugar to about 12-1/2 teaspoons (50 grams) daily (that is, 10% of calories for a 2,000 calorie diet). This can add up quickly if you enjoy sweet desserts and sugared beverages. But know that hidden sugar counts, too.  Common sources include jarred pasta sauces, energy drinks, canned fruit, and breakfast cereals. Food labels are a valuable resource to determine the sugar content of packaged foods.

For sodium, the cap is 2,400 mg daily. This amount of sodium is found in a teaspoon of salt. To meet these guidelines, it does help to avoid the salt shaker at the table, but unfortunately a major part of the sodium in American diets (80%) comes from processed and packaged foods. These foods include: frozen meals, canned or pickled foods, snack foods, condiments, and soda. Cutting sodium from your diet may make foods suddenly taste bland. But over time, your taste for sodium will adapt and you will be able to use less for the same flavor. It will also be important to rely on herbs and other seasonings to bring more flavor to your palette. Your Marcel’s chefs can help you with that!

bananaReading labels for both sodium and sugar content is the only way to know what you’re eating. However, eating foods without labels is the best kind of eating!  The less processed, the better. Making small changes that stick over time is the best strategy for tackling these latest recommendations. As stated in the Guidelines, “A lifetime of healthy eating helps to prevent chronic diseases like obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes… it is one of the most powerful tools we have.” In the spirit of healthy eating, I am sharing a simple fruit dessert recipe, Banana “Ice Cream.” Enjoy!

Banana "Ice Cream"
Serves 2
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 small (or one large) ripe banana, peeled and sliced
  2. chopped nuts, if desired
Instructions
  1. Freeze sliced bananas for at least 2 hours in an airtight container.
  2. Blend frozen bananas in a small food processor. Scrape down food processor as banana goes from crumbled to gooey and again to smooth consistency.
  3. Transfer to airtight container and freeze until solid, about 1 hour. Or eat immediately if a soft consistency is desired. When serving, garnish with chopped nuts.
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

B.F.D.* (*Breakfast for Dinner) by Kelly Montgomery

As a young mom, many years ago, I would often on occasion prepare Breakfast for Dinner, which, loosely translated, means “what we’ll be eating when it’s 6pm and I have no idea what I’m going to put on the table (again) and I didn’t quite make it to the grocery store (again) and I’m still in my pajamas (again).” Breakfast for Dinner was a go-to for a reason. It was a rare occasion when I couldn’t cobble together a satisfying meal from what could be found in the refrigerator and pantry. In those days, a breakfast in the evening was the result of an epic meal planning fail.

Screen Shot 2015-10-23 at 6.32.55 AMAs time went by, “breakfast dinner” became something else entirely–my kids’ most requested meal; one I began to plan for and intentionally include in some weekly menus.  When this shift occurred, my B.F.D. game stepped up considerably. With a little foresight and a decent grocery list, I was able to dabble in more sophisticated breakfast offerings, some of which were more involved than many of my non-breakfast standbys, most of which received an enthusiastic thumbs down from my children.  They didn’t want fancy frittatas. They had no interest in blintzes or benedicts. They didn’t see the point in trying to fix what in their opinion wasn’t broken. What they craved was good old-fashioned breakfast fare. And one of their favorites was waffles. Our favorite waffle recipe is from the book that came with the waffle maker I bought 20-some years ago. We’ve tried others, but haven’t found one that we like better. 

Sour Cream Waffles
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 eggs
  2. 1 cup sour cream
  3. ¼ cup butter or margarine - melted
  4. 1 cup buttermilk
  5. 1-1/2 cups all purpose flour
  6. 1 t. baking powder
  7. ½ t. salt
  8. ¾ t. baking soda
Instructions
  1. Combine eggs, sour cream, butter (cooled) and buttermilk. Beat until smooth. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Slowly add dry ingredients to liquid mixture; stir until well blended. Batter will be slightly lumpy. Bake according to directions provided with your waffle maker.
Adapted from Vitantonio Waffle manual
Adapted from Vitantonio Waffle manual
Marcel's Culinary Experience http://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/