Rigatoni with Broccoli and Sausage

Rigatoni with Broccoli and Sausage
Serves 4
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3-4 garlic cloves, very thinly sliced
  2. Extra-virgin olive oil
  3. 1 pound sweet or hot Italian sausage
  4. Salt and pepper
  5. 8 ounces rigatoni
  6. 1 pound broccoli, stems trimmed and peeled, stems sliced crosswise into ¼” coins, and tops cut into florets
  7. ¼ teaspoon dried chile flakes
  8. ½ cup Whipped Ricotta (recipe follows)
  9. ½-1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
  10. ¼ cup dried breadcrumbs, optional
  11. Whipped Ricotta (Makes about 1 ½ cups)
  12. 1 ½ cups whole-milk ricotta cheese (from Marché)
  13. ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  14. Freshly ground black pepper
  15. ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Put the garlic in a small bowl and pour over enough olive oil to cover. Shape the sausage into 4 balls then flatten them like a hamburger patty.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add salt until it tastes like the sea. Add the pasta and cook just shy of al dente according to the package directions.
  3. Meanwhile, heat a small glug of olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the sausage patties and cook until nicely browned on one side, about 4 minutes.
  4. Add the broccoli coins and the sliced garlic, including the oil, to the skillet. Flip the sausage patties and keep cooking until the sausage is just about fully cooked, another 4 more minutes or so. Break up the sausage with a spoon into bite-size chunks. Add the chile flakes and cook for 30 seconds or so. With a ladle, scoop out about ¼ cup of the pasta cooking water, add it to the pan to stop the cooking of everything, and slide the pan from the heat.
  5. About 3 minutes before the pasta should be al dente, add the broccoli florets and cook all together until the pasta is ready. Scoop out another cup of pasta cooking water, drain the pasta and broccoli, and add to the skillet.
  6. Return the skillet to the heat. Add ¼ cup or so of the pasta water, the whipped ricotta, and half the Parmigiano. Season the pasta generously with salt and black pepper. Shake the pan to combine the ingredients, put back over med. heat, and cook for a couple of min. to warm everything through and make a nice saucy consistency.
  7. Serve with more Parmigiano and top with the breadcrumbs, if using.
Whipped Ricotta Directions
  1. Put the ricotta, salt and 20 twists of pepper in a food processor and start to process. With the motor running, add the olive oil in a thin stream. Pause and scrape down the sides if needed. The mixture should get lovely and creamy. Taste it and adjust with more salt, pepper. Or a bit more olive oil – you should be able to taste the oil as well as the ricotta. Store in the fridge for up to 1 week.
Notes
  1. From the book: Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables by Joshua McFadden
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Summer Vegetable Gratin

Summer Vegetable Gratin
Serves 4
Print
Base
  1. 1 garlic clove, minced
  2. 1 15 ounce can tomato sauce
  3. 2 teaspoons italian seasonings
Gratin Ingredients
  1. 2 large beefsteak tomatoes
  2. 1 red onion
  3. 1 large eggplant
  4. 1 zucchini
  5. 1 summer squash
  6. 8 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese
  7. 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  8. Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Stir together base ingredients in a 9x13 inch baking dish.
  3. Wash the vegetables. Cut each vegetable into 1/2 inch slices.
  4. Arrange vegetables and cheese over base, alternating colors.
  5. Top with fresh thyme, salt and pepper to taste. Cover with foil and bake for 39 minutes. Remove foil and bake another 15 minutes.
Notes
  1. This is a great side dish and can also be a main served over pasta.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Chef Talk: Lessons Learned At The Table by Kelly Sears

There are 275 countries in the world; 19 major world religions; 6,500 spoken languages. Food is the one universal. Food has no language barrier, is borderless, and is entry: entry to people, their culture, their families, their lives. 

In a tribute to his friend Anthony Bourdain, Anderson Cooper shared “in places near and far in the world, he talked, tasted, with open mouth, and eyes, and open heart and mind.” Simple, yet with depth; raw and honest, much like the man we think we knew as Anthony Bourdain.

Bourdain expressed “…everywhere in the world, we go, and we ask these very simple questions, what makes you happy, what do you like to eat, what do you cook? We tend to get some really astonishing answers. People are telling you a story when they give you food. If you don’t accept the food, you are, in many cultures, whether in rural Arkansas or Vietnam, you are, rejecting the people.”

   When you sit down with someone and share their food, you are sharing their story.  People are telling you something about themselves with each bite, each sip, each serving.  No matter how small the size of the offering, the gesture is large, and the moment is magic.

We all tell a story through our food. If you listen closely, the dish will share more than the cook will reveal in standard conversation. It’s the ingredient not listed in the recipe, not found on the grocery list. It’s the depth of flavor, the peek inside, that if you are lucky enough, you can taste in each bite.

My husband is a landlord to college students. Our tenants represent the melting pot of not only America, but also the world. If you stay within the confines of your job, the relationship is tenant/landlord. But if you take the time to say hello, learn a name, discover what part of the map is home, doors open, and magic happens; you share a table. He calls them by name, they call him Mr. Dan.

Two young engineering students from a small village outside of Beijing invited us to their apartment to make dumplings. Multi-generational, mom and grandmother were visiting and deftly rolling out dumplings with the speed of a twelve-person assembly line. Every dumpling is the exact shape and size. Once all the dough was ready, it was time to fill.  Their dumplings were perfect, beautifully shaped, properly proportioned. Ours, overstuffed and unable to close. With direction, “the dumpling is the purse, the meat filling the money. Don’t let the money fall out of the purse.” An “ah ha” moment for sure; our dumpling skills improved. The meal was set out on two card tables, served on paper plates, with lots of chairs crammed around the tables. Make room for what’s important, worry less about what’s not.

Several young men from Saudi Arabia invited Mr. Dan to stay for coffee after he fixed their leaky faucet.  They set a cup in front of him and filled it half way. Mr. Dan said, only half a cup? The host then shared that his father, and his grandfather before him, taught him that you invite someone to stay by only filling their cup halfway. This way, the cup will constantly need to be filled, a little bit at a time, encouraging the guest to continue to stay and visit. When you fill the cup all the way, you are inviting them to leave; as in, This WILL be your only cup!  Half full leaves you room for more.

We invited some new tenants, a lovely Hispanic couple, over to teach us how to make tamales. We spoke with our hands, so we could understand one another. When I was about to add water in with the masa, my hand was tapped, and an index finger waved no-no.  She pointed to the pot where the pork had slow cooked and then back to the masa bowl. Yes, of course! Water tastes like water, but pork juice tastes delicious!!  We followed the leader and tied the husks. We counted hands and realized twelve hands make a hundred tamales easier than two. Share the work and it doesn’t feel like work.

After long holiday breaks, some would return with gifts for Mr. Dan, gifts from their home: tea leaves as fragrant as the small-town countryside, homemade candies and sweets from their villages, silk scarves, a Qur’an. Share a dumpling, a coffee, a tamale; open a door to a connection. This is me, this is how I live.

We spend a lot of time watching food TV, taking pictures of food, posting food but how much time do we spend breaking bread.  We look down into phones instead of up into experiences.  We can probably identify people by the parts in their hair rather than the colors of their eyes. How much time do we spend listening and connecting (the wireless kind).

Whether it’s a kitchen table, dining table, picnic table or folding table, pull up a chair and gather round. Eat what’s offered off the fork. People open up when you nod and say “yes please” to the plate being passed. More tales are told, more stories shared. It’s the first step to a connection, to listening.

May your purse hold money, your coffee cup never completely full, may you talk and taste with an open mouth, and eyes, with an open heart and mind. I know you’ll never leave hungry.

Bread can be sliced, dipped, slathered or torn, goes with any meal, can be served piping hot, toasted or stale tossed in a salad. Most recipes make two loaves, or in this case, rolls. Break Bread and Connect.

Pepper Bacon Bread
Yields 20
Print
Ingredients
  1. 340 grams Russet or Yukon Gold Potatoes
  2. 70 grams reserved Potato Cooking Liquid
  3. 14 grams reserved bacon fat (can substitute butter here)
  4. 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  5. 332 grams all-purpose flour
  6. 9 grams sea salt
  7. 72 grams bacon, cooked and crumbed (fat reserved, see above)
  8. 5 grams coarse black pepper (may prefer 3 grams if making rolls)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees one hour prior to baking (baking vessel too)
  2. Boil potatoes (unpeeled) until tender, about 15-20 minutes
  3. Reserve 70 grams of the cooking water; set aside potatoes and liquid to cool
  4. Once cooled, mash the potatoes
  5. In a mixing bowl, combine the mashed potatoes, reserved cooking liquid, bacon fat and instant yeast. Stir to combine
  6. Add half the flour and stir well (the mixture will be crumbly)
  7. Add the rest of the flour and the sea salt and stir. The mixture will seem very dry
  8. Use your hands and squeeze, press, and knead the mixture until it comes together as a dough
  9. Scrape the mass of dough on to a work surface and knead the dough 5-6 minutes. The dough will start out quite stiff and dry but will moisten over time
  10. Press the dough into a rectangle, top with bacon and pepper. Knead for a couple more minutes to incorporate the bacon and pepper
  11. Place in an oiled container, cover with plastic and ferment for 30 minutes
  12. After 30 minutes, fold the dough, cover again and let rest for 30 minutes
  13. After 30 minutes, the dough is ready to be shaped (loaf, batard or rolls)
  14. Proof the dough for 45 minutes to an hour; it should swell nicely and have a springy texture
  15. Once the loaf has risen, score the top from end to end
  16. Bake for 30-40 minutes until golden browned
Adapted from Zingerman’s, Ann Arbor, MI
Adapted from Zingerman’s, Ann Arbor, MI
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

My Love of Marcel’s Cooking Classes by Graeme Reinhart

Welcome to our guest blogger Graeme Reinhart who has been taking classes in the Marcel’s kitchen since we opened and is currently enjoying his time in our classes for 12 – 16 year olds.  Read on for more about Graeme and his love of cooking.  Thanks for sharing, Graeme!
************************************************************************************************************
How long have you been taking classes at Marcels? 
I think I’ve been taking these classes for close to 6 years.  I know I was really excited when I got to start going to the Mid-Kid classes. Now I’m in the Big Kid classes. 
 
What do you enjoy most about the cooking classes?
I enjoy learning how to cook and learning new techniques, such as when we learned different knife skills.  The first trick I remember Chef Jamie teaching us was to always crack your eggs into separate bowls in case one egg wasn’t good.  I also remember the tip about washing your hands with a metal spoon to get rid of the garlic smell.  And of course, I like getting the discount to use at the end of class so I can get some new cooking gadgets. 
 
What are some key things you have learned from these classes?
The tips and tricks; why certain things in cooking are the way they are, and what gives certain foods their taste.
 
How would you like to use these skills in the future?
I want to continue to learn more advanced skills because it seems like we are refining our skills in these classes.  I like to know the correct way of doing things because the correct way is usually easier and if it is the correct way, it usually tastes better!  Chef Robin told us to always cut peppers with the skin down, that way it’s easier to cut them. She also taught us the right way to cut an onion, and I’m still trying to remind my mom not to cut the root!
 
Can you tell of a time you made the recipes outside the cooking class?
I’ve made the jalapeño coleslaw chicken sandwiches for out of state friends. I make the egg drop soup every so often as an after school snack.  I also liked recreating the lemon chicken, lasagna and a lot of the desserts too.  I still need to make the clam chowder that was so good. 
 
Do you have a favorite kind of food you like to eat?  
I’m pretty adventurous. I love trying new things so I wouldn’t say I have a favorite. 
 
Any thoughts of becoming a chef?
No, not at all.  I think it’d be difficult job, but I do want to learn how to cook better. 
 
What kind of class would you like to see that you haven’t experienced yet?
I’d like to cook foods from exotic countries and learn more advanced techniques.
 
To register for one of our fabulous kids classes, click on the appropriate age below:

Savory Spring Dutch Baby

Savory Spring Dutch Baby
Print
Basic Dutch Baby
  1. 6 eggs
  2. 1 cup whole milk
  3. 1 stick unsalted butter
  4. 1 cup all purpose flour (or use gluten-free flour)
  5. salt and pepper to taste
  6. 2 tablespoons of Gruyere, grated
Spring Toppings
  1. 1 bunch asparagus, sliced into bite-sized pieces
  2. 1 package baby bella mushrooms, sliced
  3. 1 package cherry tomatoes, sliced
  4. 1 cup walnuts
  5. 2 tablespoons of butter
  6. salt and pepper to taste
  7. 1/2 cup herbed goat cheese, crumbled
Basic Dutch Baby
  1. Preheat oven to 425F, placing 12” cast iron pan inside oven. Place stick of butter in the cast iron pan and return the pan to the oven. Meanwhile, blend basic dutch baby ingredients, less the remaining butter, in a high-speed blender. Slowly add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to the mixture. Remove the cast iron from the oven and pour the batter into the hot pan, bake for 25 - 30 minutes, making sure not to open the oven door the first 20 minutes.
  2. Spring Toppings
  3. In a hot skillet, add butter and mushrooms. Bring the heat down to medium-high and cook until tender and just golden. Add the asparagus and cook until just tender. Salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Final Touches
  5. When the Dutch Baby is cooked, top it with the vegetables, and walnuts, top with goat cheese. Slice, Serve and Enjoy.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Quick-Sautéed Shrimp with Sweet Toasty Garlic

Quick-Sautéed Shrimp with Sweet Toasty Garlic
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 pound large peeled, deveined but tail on raw shrimp
  2. 6 cloves garlic, minced
  3. 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (or olive oil)
  4. 1 teaspoon salt
  5. 1 lime zested and juice
  6. 1 large chipotle in adobo, seeds and ribs removed and minced
  7. 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro
Instructions
  1. Heat a large nonstick sauté pan over high heat. Add the oil. When oil is hot, add the shrimp, salt and garlic and sauté, stirring often.
  2. When shrimp are almost done, add the lime zest, juice, chipotle and cilantro. Sauté a minute more until shrimp are done. Remove from heat.
Notes
  1. Sautéing requires very high heat and very little fat. Great for shrimp or sea scallops. A wok works great, otherwise a large skillet so you can move the fish around.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Vegetarian Street Tacos

Vegetarian Street Tacos
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 ripe peeled avocado
  2. 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  3. 1/2 cup mexican cream (crema), greek yogurt or sour cream
  4. 3 tablespoon finely chopped red onion
  5. 1/2 cup red cabbage, shredded
  6. 1 lime
  7. 1 teaspoon honey
  8. 1 tablespoon adobo sauce (from canned chipotle chiles)
  9. 1 ear of corn
  10. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  11. 1 cup sliced portabella mushrooms
  12. 1 cup black beans
  13. 1 package small “street” style corn tortillas
  14. 6 tablespoons crumbled Cotija or feta cheese
  15. Fresh cilantro, chopped
Instructions
  1. Place avocados in a blender; add crema, chopped cilantro, lime juice from 1/2 lime, salt and pepper, to taste, blend until smooth and creamy, set aside.
  2. Combine red onion, shredded cabbage, lime juice from 1/2 lime, and honey, salt and pepper, to taste. Toss together and set aside.
  3. Char corn on open flame of the stovetop, turning with tongs. Cool and cut off the cob, set aside.
  4. Heat heavy pan to medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add mushrooms; sauté 5 minutes, or until most of liquid evaporates. Add in corn and black beans; sauté 4 minutes or until tender. Stir in adobo sauce, and salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Place warm tortilla on plate. Spread 1 1/2 tablespoons avocado mixture in center of each tortilla. Top with slaw, 1/4 cup mushroom mixture, 1 1/2 teaspoons cheese and cilantro leaves, if desired.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Thai Chicken Flatbread

Thai Chicken Flatbread
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 tablespoons Olive oil
  2. 1/2 pound Chicken Breast - boneless skinless cut into chunks
  3. 4 Green Onions - chopped
  4. 1 Carrot - shredded
  5. 1/2 cup Mushroom slices
  6. Jade Mekong Ginger Sauce
  7. Naan flat bread or your favorite prepared pizza crust
  8. 2 cups Mozzarella cheese
  9. 2 tablespoons chopped Peanuts
  10. 4 tablespoons chopped Cilantro
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Heat oil in skillet and cook chicken cubes until cooked through - about 6 minutes. Season with 2 T Mekong ginger sauce, salt, pepper, add green onions, mushrooms and cook another few minutes.
  3. Spread a thin layer of Mekong sauce over the Naan bread. Top with chicken mixture, a generous amount of cheese, shredded carrots and a few more green onions. Cook flatbreads for about 8 minutes or until cheese is bubbly. Serve with cilantro and chopped peanut garnish.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Beet Farro Pistachio Goat Cheese Salad

Beet Farro Pistachio Goat Cheese Salad
Serves 4
Print
Ingredients
  1. 4 beets - sliced into quarters
  2. 1 tablespoon olive oil
  3. 1/2 cup farro
  4. 2 cups fresh spinach
  5. 2 tablespoons pistachios
  6. 1/4 cup crumbled goat cheese
  7. Balsamic vinegar
Instructions
  1. Turn oven on to 400. Prepare beets; coat in olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Bake for 15 minutes or so until done. Let cool.
  2. To prepare farro—combine 1 1/2 cups of water and 1/2 cup farro in medium saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to low, cover and cook for 10-15 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes. Let cool.
  3. To assemble the salad - place the farro and beets on the spinach. Sprinkle with pistachio nuts and crumble goat cheese on top. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/

Serrano Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Patties

Serrano Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Patties
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 pound ground chicken
  2. 1 can water chestnuts, drained
  3. 4 green onions, white and green parts
  4. 1/2 cup Serrano Ginger Lemongrass Sauce (Marshall’s brand Haute Sauce)
  5. 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
  6. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  7. 1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
  8. 1 egg, beaten
  9. 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
  10. 1 tablespoon butter
  11. 1 tablespoon olive oil
Instructions
  1. Either by hand or in a food processor, finely chop the water chestnuts and green onion.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the chicken, chopped ingredients, sauce, bread crumbs, and salt and pepper together by hand.
  3. Form the mixture into patties. Dip each in the beaten egg, then in the bread crumbs, coating both sides.
  4. Heat the butter and olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. In batches, and without crowding, place the patties in the skillet. Cook about 5 minutes on the first side and 3 minutes on the second side, flipping only one time.
Notes
  1. Adapted from the marshallshautesauce website.
Marcel's Culinary Experience https://www.marcelsculinaryexperience.com/